35 Interesting Conversation Starters For Teens

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The teen years are a wonderful time of growth, development, and understanding of one’s self and who they are starting to become.

It’s amazing for parents to see their child slowly blossoming and beginning their journey into adulthood.

But with all the changes going on, physically, mentally, and emotionally, it can be overwhelming for our kids — and challenging for Moms and Dads, too.

It’s a story that’s been heard many times before: Your child, who used to be so talkative and chatty with you, suddenly becomes a big fan of one-word, noncommittal responses.

Where once they used to be so open and so full of tales and thoughts and ideas to share, now there seems to be a wall that’s hindering conversations and free-flowing exchanges.

But… How how can you change this?

conversation starters for teens

Trying to get teens to engage in a conversation with parents can be incredibly tough. Sometimes it may even feel like an impossible task.

And that can be very frustrating for Moms and Dads who really, really just want to be able to converse and connect with their children. 

Sure, there’s still some communication going on. But it usually just revolves now on the day-to-day:

Have you eaten? Do you have homework? When are you doing your chores? No, you can’t stay glued to your gaming console. What time is basketball tryouts?

That’s all well and good — it’s important to stay aware and up-to-date with your kids when it comes to their activities, school, and the like. 

But it’s also as important to have meaningful conversations with them. To connect about things like their dreams, fears, values. To find out how they feel, what they think of themselves and what’s around them — these are valuable exchanges that will also help you to be able to be there for them and guide them.

Teens may not share their emotions as freely as before, but they need their Moms and Dads now more than ever.

Just as they needed you once upon a time to hold their hands when they walk and hug them to sleep, now they need your presence, they need that connection with you, they need to be able to lean on you and know that your love and guidance and understanding will always be there for them. 

And as your kids get older, it’s also fun to know what they think about even the most mundane things like their favorite food or places they wanna go or what they would do with a thousand bucks.

These seemingly small things are actually valuable pieces of information you can bond over and connect with, too!

No conversation with your child is too small or mundane, no sharing of thoughts and emotions are insignificant.

Every small exchange helps to strengthen your communication and make your connection to each other stronger. And each talk helps to remind your child that you are always there to listen to them, and you will always be genuinely interested in their lives and in what they have to say.

And though sometimes it may not seem like it, they are always listening to you too, and what you say matter to them more than you know. 

But how to go about it, you may ask. Well, we have a collection of conversation starters for teens that will help you be able to reach out to them.

Why You Should Try These Conversation Starters for Teens

These conversation topics for teens can be your starting point to wonderful exchanges with your children.

You can use them as is or word them a little differently depending on their age or the approach you feel may work best. 

Pick and choose some of these conversation starters for teens, and let the talking flow from there!

Remember not to overwhelm them with too many all at once — choose the right times (and when the mood is right and when they’re not too tired or hungry or busy!) for conversations, and spread them out.

And be honest with your answers, too. The more times you and your child connect, the deeper and more meaningful the conversations will become. 

As parents, you’ll always look forward to these times to connect. And before you know it, your children will be looking forward to these moments just as much as you — if they haven’t been already!

You’ll be fostering a relationship defined by openness, a willingness to listen and understand, and a real connection. Good luck, and happy conversing!

35 Conversation Starters For Teens

Get the ball rolling with these conversation starters for teens. You’ll be pleasantly surprised at the amazing talks that can stem from these conversation topics!

What would your perfect day look like? What would you do and who would you be with?

If you could only eat one food for the rest of your life, what would it be? What is the weirdest food you’ve ever tried? 

What does money mean to you? If someone gave you $1000 dollars right now, what would you do with it?

If you were given a chance to become immortal, would you take it? Why or why not?

If you could meet anyone, dead or alive, who would you meet? What would you say to them?

Would you rather be a TV star or a movie star? If you could star in any TV or movie, what would it be?

What superpower would you like to have and why? If you could be invisible for a day, what would you do?

What object that you own means the most to you or has the most sentimental value? 

What are the top five things you like about yourself? If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be and why?

Would you rather be 5 years younger or 5 years older? Where do you see yourself 5 years, 10 years from now? What is your dream job?

What are the things that make you angry? What hurts your feelings? How do you calm down, or what helps you feel better when that happens?

What are your greatest fears, and why? What’s something other people are scared of, but you are not? 

What makes you sad, and who or what makes you feel better when you are sad? 

Who or what always makes you laugh? Who or what always makes you laugh the hardest?

What is the best compliment you have ever received? Who gave it to you and why does it mean so much?

If you could go anywhere in the world, where would you want to go? Who would you want to be with on that trip, or is that something you want to experience alone?

Do you look having alone time? Why is having alone time, or “me time”, important? 

Who is your favorite teacher? If you were made a teacher for a day, what would you teach to your class?

What is your favorite subject in school? What subject do you wish you just didn’t have to learn? If you could add a new subject, what would it be?

What part of the school day do you look forward to the most, and what part do you dread?

Would you consider yourself shy or more outgoing? When do you feel yourself getting shy, and how do you deal with it? 

Do adults automatically deserve respect? Do kids deserve respect too? How can a person earn respect?

What is something you are really good at? What is a skill that you would like to learn and why? What skill can you share or teach to others? 

Who do you look up to and why? Who do you think looks up to you? What do you think makes for a good role model? 

What is the first thing on your bucket list? Why does it have the number one spot?

What do you value most in your life? What are the three things you are most grateful for?

If you could change your first name, what would you choose to call yourself? If you could also change your last name, what would you change it to? 

What is the one family rule you love or appreciate? If you could make a new family rule, what would it be?

What is your favorite childhood memory with your family? What do you wish you and your family would do again, or more often, together? 

What do you love the most about your family? What is your favorite moment or experience with your family?

What are you most excited for in the future? What scares you the most about the future?

If it were up to you, how would you change the world? 

What are the things you feel very strongly or passionately about?

Do you live life by any motto? Why is that motto so meaningful to you? 

Where do you get inspiration from? Who or what inspires you? Do you want to be an inspiration to others as well?

Conclusion:

Once you’ve begun with these conversation starters for teens, keep communication flowing be sharing your own thoughts and expanding on what your kids have started to share with you.

Be open with your kids, and always let them feel that they can be open with you as well.

And be patient if it may seem challenging at the beginning — it will get better. You’ll soon be sharing many memorable conversations with each other!

Are you interested in more parenting tips? Read about these 6 Effective Ways to Deal with Your Kid’s Tantrums!

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